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1892 ~ School Finances

                                    


Ruislip Church of England School

Finances - 1892 

By 1892 Ruislip Church of England School received funding from a number of sources, the Parish Church of St Martin's - almost exclusively through annual Subscriptions by its wealthier parishioners; grants from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; and from the Government through an annual grant, the amount of which was determined by average pupil attendance and an examination of pupils conducted by a visiting Inspector.  Since the autumn of 1891 it had ceased to receive Fees from parents to support their children's education, rather it was paid a Government Grant in lieu, though it was not clear whether this new grant would cover the amount lost through the introduction of 'Free Education'.

The School was primarily the responsibility of the Parish Church - there was no safety net and a failure to provide financially would lead to its closure and consequent replacement with a state funded school teaching an entirely secular curriculum.  This being the case, there was always concern to ensure it was properly funded, a situation which was to finally come to a head in the 1920's.  

The annual school accounts were published in the September issue of the Parish Magazine  :-

Ruislip School Accounts for Year Ending May 31st 1892.

 

Receipts

 

 

 

 

Expenditure

 

 

 

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

£

s.

d.

June 1st, Balance in hand

50

17

2

 

Salaries of Teachers

120

0

4

Archer, Major

0

10

0

 

                 Assistants

18

10

9

Baker, Ingham, Mr.

5

0

0

 

          Candidate on Probation

8

12

0

Barnes, H.H. Mr.

5

0

0

 

Books, Apparatus and Stationery

10

3

0

Campbell, H. H., Sir

8

0

0

 

Fuel, Light and Cleaning

22

12

5

Cox, H.R., Mr. (the late)

5

0

0

 

Repairs to Furniture and Buildings

35

17

3

Craggs, Mr.

2

2

0

 

Insurance

0

15

0

Deane, F.H. Mr. (the late)

5

0

0

 

Book Prizes for Children

3

16

10

Ewer, Edwin, Mr.

2

0

0

 

School Fees returned, 1st Quarter

1

14

1

Ewer, H.J., Mr.

2

0

0

 

Diocesan Inspection of Schools

1

3

6

Ewer, James, Mr.

1

0

0

 

Cheque Book

0

2

6

Edwards-Bennett, Mrs.

10

0

0

 

Balance in hand, May 31st 1892

35

2

0

Hilliard, Mr.

3

3

0

 

 

 

 

 

Inglis, Colonel

2

2

0

 

 

 

 

 

Jones-Helsham, Mr.

2

2

0

 

 

 

 

 

Laurence, Mrs.

2

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Long, W., Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

Martin, C., Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

Millar, C.W., Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

Murch, W.J. Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

Nash, Alfred, Mr.

0

5

0

 

 

 

 

 

Saich, W., Mr.

0

5

0

 

 

 

 

 

Sherley, Mrs.

1

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Stilling, W., Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

Thornhill-Clarke, Mr.

2

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Taylor, H., Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

Vicar, The

3

3

0

 

 

 

 

 

Woodland, W., Mr

1

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Wilshin, J., Mr.

1

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Woodman, Augustus, Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

Watkins, G., Sen., Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

Watkins, G.. Jun., Mr.

0

10

0

 

 

 

 

 

School Fees, 1st Quarter

8

12

0

 

 

 

 

 

                 Paid by Guardians

1

18

0

 

 

 

 

 

Government Grant

86

5

6

 

 

 

 

 

Drawing Grant

2

15

11

 

 

 

 

 

Ecclesiastical Commissioners

3

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Kingís College, Cambridge

10

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Fee Grant, 2nd Quarter

13

2

6

 

 

 

 

 

Fee Grant,3rd Quarter

13

2

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£258

9

4

 

 

£258

9

4

W.J. Murch, Auditor.

 

In the October Parish Magazine the Vicar was to outline more fully the effects of the move from School Fees to Fee Grant.  Yet again he was to stress the need for parents to ensure their children attended school regularly.  He also pointed out the evils that attended children who were permitted to finish schooling on the basis they had achieved success in the annual Inspection.  :

Vicarís Monthly Letter

My Dear Parishioners,
In my last letter I promised to acquaint you with the results of the Fee Grant System which came into force on September 1st, 1891.  As our school year begins on June 1st, there were consequently only nine months in the past school year during which the Fee Grant was received.  By the Fee Grant is meant the sum of money which the Education Department pays to the School in lieu of the school pence formerly paid by the parents.  In the three quarters ending November, February, and May, the amount realised for Fee Grant was £41 5s. , whilst the pence paid by the parents for the first quarter amounted to £10 10s. 9d., making a total of £51 15s. 9d. for the year.  Now, on looking back to the school accounts for the previous year (June, 1890, to May, 1891) I find that the school pence received during that time amounted to £56 1s. 9d., or £4 6s. more than under the first year of the Fee Grant System.  This you may say tells against the latter so far as the money receipts are concerned; but you must remember that under the old system the school pence were paid irrespective of the number of attendances made by the children, whereas under the new system the Fee Grant of ten shillings per child is calculated on the average attendance for the year.  This shows how very important it is that parents who now have no school pence to pay should insist on their children attending school so as to raise the average attendance, and thereby the amount gained by the school.  I do not think that parents sufficiently realise the importance of keeping their children regularly at school, not only for the childrenís own sake, but also to benefit the funds of the school.  The average attendance ought, under the new system, to rise rapidly, but in spite of the abolition of school pence whereby the parentsí pockets are saved to the extent of between £50 and £60 a year, it has only gone up from 105 to 110.  For the current year the Managers will receive 10s. per child, calculated on last yearís average attendance, which was 110, the payment being made quarterly.  The average attendance should be much higher than it is, and it rests with you to send it up, according as you send your children regularly or otherwise.

I also wish I could impress upon you the wisdom of keeping your children at school until they reach the age of thirteen at the least.  It would not seem unreasonable to expect this of you, seeing that their education virtually costs you nothing; but I am sorry to find that many of you take away your children from school the moment they are partially or wholly exempt, and sometimes even before they are entitled to leave school.  I have known cases in which children have been removed from school at the tender age of ten years, simply because they have passed the required standard.  They have then been sent out to work with results often ruinous to health and morals.  This is a matter surely of immense importance, and often proves unfair in the end to the children themselves.  There is much difficulty surrounding the enforcing of school attendance, but it rests chiefly with the parents, whose plain and simple duty it is to send their children regularly to school.  May I ask those of you who are parents to attend to this important duty?  

I call your attention to the Notice respecting Technical Education Classes to be held for this district at Uxbridge during the coming winter months, but I much fear that the hours appointed for the Classes will be a hindrance to your attending in any numbers from our Parish.  
                                                       Believe me 
                                                         
Your faithful Friend and Vicar,   
                                                                                                Thomas Marsh Everett

 

 

            

     

First uploaded: 21 April 2018