The BWI Archives

1899 ~ School Finances

                                    

Ruislip Church of England School
Finances - 1899

In addition to the usual presentation of the school's list of Subscribers and Annual Accounts, considerable space was given over to acquiring additional funds.  In the main this was caused by a very significant expenditure on the school house, though other items related to the school building itself were requiring attention. Also, there was clearly a reduction of subscription funds as some wealthy residents had moved away or died.  In part, these financial concerns are to be found in the Managers' Minutes.  However, the Vicar was to write at length in the Parish Magazine on several occasions, and the raising of the necessary funds to cover the debt incurred through the extension of the school house may not have been completed at the time of the Revd Thomas Marsh Everett's death in 1900. 

May 1899  

Parish News

All Subscriptions to the Schools are now due, as the accounts for the year end with this month.  It is of the utmost importance to try and get the number of subscribers increased, or the grant in aid now being annual given may be withdrawn.  There must be many parishioners whose children are now being educated free of all cost who ought to give annually a subscription of some amount to the Schools.  Will they send something to the Vicar this month?

 

June 1899

The Vicar’s Letter

My Dear Parishioners, -
We are drawing near the end of May, I have had no response to my appeal last month for a few subscriptions from parents whose children are educated free of cost to them at our National Schools.  If they only knew what a disagreeable duty it is to be perpetually asking for money for various objects, as I have to do, they would pity my feelings, and send in subscriptions without further asking.  It is most important and necessary in these days to keep up the amount of our voluntary subscriptions, when we are getting a grant-in-aid from the Government as an encouragement to make our Schools efficient; and that grant-in-aid is given on the understanding that there should be no falling off in voluntary contributions.  Our Schools are generously supported by all our principal parishioners, with one or two exceptions, and it would seem only fair that those who I may call without office the middle class should be equally desirous of giving a helping hand in this matter.  Our expenses are increasing annually, and if our present average attendance is kept up we may have to enlarge the School buildings.  Then there is the master’s house also needing enlargement; so that in all probability we shall have a special expenditure to face over and above our annual cost of the Schools.  We have been treated liberally by the London Diocesan Schools Association in the amount of grant-in-aid allotted to our Schools.  Last year it was £32; this year it is £38, and a claim for £40 has been put in for next years.  This ought surely to encourage us to do all in our power to help ourselves when we are getting such substantial aid from outside.

   

August 1899

The Vicar’s Letter

My Dear Parishioners, -
I write again this month on matters relating to our National Schools. The Accounts for the year ending May 31st, 1899 are now before you, and show very satisfactory results.  Compared with the previous year, the Income has increased by £44 16s. 3d., and shows an improvement all round.  There was an increase on the Annual Grant, inclusive of Drawing Grant, of £21, on the Fee Grant of £11, and on the Aid Grant of £4, whilst the Voluntary Contributions exceeded those for the previous year by about £14.  The Grant for drawing is no longer paid as a separate item by the Science and Art Department, but is now included in the Annual Grant.  The School has in fact earned again the highest grant, thus reflecting great credit both on Teachers and Scholars.  It should be the earnest endeavour of all to continue to maintain this improved efficiency so that the school may rank as high in the future as in the present.  The average attendance for the year was 151.  It might have been higher if certain children on the books had been more regular.  I wish parents would remember that whenever they keep their children away from school they are lessening the earning grant, as well as depriving their children of the education they ought to be receiving, for on average attendance depends not only the chief amount of the Annual grant, but the entire amount of the Fee Grant.  It is in the power of children in the Mixed School to earn from 30 to 32 shillings per child, and of Infants to earn 27 shillings per child inclusive of the Fee Grants each year.  I have to thank all subscribers to the schools for their liberal voluntary contributions.  It is most necessary that these should be kept up, for there would appear to be a tendency in some school to show a falling off in voluntary contributions since the Aid Grant was given.  This at all events cannot be said of us.  We appreciate the Aid Grant by an increasing list of subscribers. This is as it should be. By means of the Aid grant we have been enabled to provide the School with new Desks and to keep up the increased salaries of our staff of Teachers.  The Inspector’s Report is, as usual, somewhat scanty, and scarcely does full justice, in my humble opinion, to the general character of the school.  But our Balance Sheet speaks for itself, showing more satisfactory results than would be imagined from the Report.  Some of you will not fail to notice that we have a good balance in hand of about £50.  Let me say a work or two on this.  In the past year I endeavoured to nurse our income so that the managers might in a a position to put forward some alterations to enlargement of Infants’ Room, and to provide additional accommodation in the Master’s house.  I need only now say that the latter is in hand, and that two rooms will be added before Michaelmas next.  I shall shortly have to make some special appeal to pay for these improvements as they cannot be entirely met out of income.  It is many years since any special appeal has been made to landowners and occupiers on behalf of the fabric of the school premises, so I hope we shall one and all be ready to give a helping hand to raise the necessary money for these two purposes.  The Annual grant for the year just ended is £153 14s. 3d., or sixpence less than previous year; but we have been fined this year in the sum of sixteen shillings and eightpence on account of diminished staff for a portion of the year owing to change of teachers.

List of Subscribers to Ruislip Schools

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

£

s.

d.

The Ecclesiastical Commissioners

3

0

0

 

Mr. H. H. Barnes

5

0

0

Mr. H. Powell

0

10

0

 

Mr. Chester Abercrombie

1

1

0

Mr. A. Helsham-Jones.

2

2

0

 

Mr. L. Ingham Baker

3

0

0

Ruislip Cricket Club

0

5

0

 

Mr. Ross-Thomson

1

0

0

Mr. Cullingford

0

5

0

 

Mr. C.E. Ashmore

2

2

0

Colonel F. Cox

5

0

0

 

Mr. W. Morford

1

0

0

Lord Hillingdon

5

0

0

 

Mr. W. J. Murch

0

10

0

Ruislip Football Club

0

5

0

 

Mr. W. Woodland

1

0

0

Mr. Hilliard

3

3

0

 

Mr. John Boyle

4

0

0

Mr. Edwin Ewer

2

0

0

 

Mrs. Laurence

2

0

0

The Vicar

3

0

0

 

Mr. Ed. Bluhm

1

10

6

King’s College, Cambridge

10

0

0

 

Mr. F. J. Small

0

10

0

Mr. R. H. Deane

3

10

0

 

Mr. J. Wilshin

1

0

0

The Deane Trustees

1

10

0

 

Mr. H. J. Ewer

2

0

0

Mr. Clarke-Thornhill

2

0

0

 

Mr. James Ewer

1

0

0

Mr. H. V. Warrender

3

0

0

 

Mr. Augustus Woodman

0

10

0

Miss Eleanor Warrender

3

0

0

 

Mr. H. Taylor

0

10

0

Mr. W. E. Vellacott

5

0

0

 

Mr. C. Martin

0

10

0

Mrs. Bennett-Edwards

10

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Captain Sullivan

4

4

0

 

 

£94

17

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruislip Schools Balance Sheet
For year ending May 31st, 1899

Income

 

 

 

 

Expenditure

 

 

 

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

£

s.

d.

Balance in hand, June 1st, 1898

13

16

2

 

Salaries of Teachers

128

5

5

Grant from Education Department

153

14

9

 

            Assistants

91

15

10

Fee Grant

82

12

6

 

Books, Apparatus and Stationery

37

6

2

Aid Grant

38

0

0

 

Fuel, Light and Cleaning

35

19

6

Voluntary Contributions of

 

 

 

 

Replacement of Furniture and Repairs to Buildings

37

5

6

   Private Individuals

81

7

6

 

Rates and Insurance

2

1

3

   Societies

13

10

0

 

Sundries

1

6

0

Sale of Needlework

0

14

0

 

Balance in hand, May 31st, 1898

50

7

3

Use of Schoolroom

0

12

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£384

6

11

 

 

£384

6

11

  T.M. Everett, Treasurer
H. W. Woodbridge, Auditor

    

October 1899

The Vicar’s Letter

My Dear Parishioners,
My letter this month must be about school matters.  Within the last two months the proposed enlargement of the schoolmaster’s house has been carried out by the addition of one sitting-room and one bedroom. The house now consists of two sitting-rooms, kitchen, and back kitchen, and four bed-rooms.  The entrance has been brought nearer to the schoolroom, and now faces west instead of north as before.  The staircase has been materially improved by the addition of a dormer window in the roof, thus affording light and ventilation where none before existed.  The old part of the house has been thoroughly renovated, and the exterior painted throughout.  All this has cost about £120, and although there is a certain balance in hand from last year’s general account, a portion of which can be applied towards the above expenditure, yet, inasmuch as there has been a considerable extra and special outlay on the master’s house, this ought to be met by extraordinary efforts on the part of all who are interested in promoting the comforts and well being of the head-teachers.  For some years past the Managers had been aware of the meagre room accommodation in the School House, and this has been made a subject of complaint by successive teachers who have lived there.  The last master, who left us in the spring of this year, told me that he would never have come if he had previously seen the house before accepting the appointment, whilst the present teachers on taking office extracted a promise from the Managers that the house should be improved in size.  Hence the Managers were almost forced into granting the additional accommodation now supplied.  I merely mention this lest any of you should think the enlargement was not needed.  It had become a necessity, and now it has been carried out.  But we have to make a special effort to raise about £100.  Here is an opportunity for one and all to give a helping hand.  (1) The owners of property within the parish. (2) The occupiers who have no School Board rate to pay. (3) Parents whose children are educated entirely free of all cost to themselves. (4) Friends who may once have lived amongst us and would now like to give us a brotherly help.  Surely it ought not to be difficult to raise this sum amongst so many, and I shall hope ere Christmas comes, to have achieved this result.  If I may be allowed to set as example in the matter by way of encouraging others, I should like to add that I will start the subscription list by offering one-fifteenth part of the whole cost. I know that this is not the best time of year to make such an appeal, but since the money must be raised, the appeal must go forth, so I commend it to your notice, and I feel sure you will respond to it.  It is fifteen years since the last call was made on the pockets of parishioners for building purposes at the Schools, so that I do not think you can say that your resources have been taxed by help given to the Schools. This affords to my mind a strong reason for generous treatment on your part at the present time, even though it may involve a little self-denial in making a donation.  Kindly give the subject your very best consideration and, if approached in the right spirit, it will, I am confident, meet with the desired result.  I will only add, the sooner the better.

There are other alterations at the Schools which would be very desirable, if we had the funds to carry them out, notably the enlargement of the Infants Class’ Room, but this can stand over for the present, as it is in the summer that more room is wanted, when the “babies” are set to school.  

    

November 1899  

The Vicar’s Letter  

My Dear Parishioners,  
I am beginning to wonder whether you ever read your Parish Magazine and my letters which appear in it.  Did I not in last month’s Magazine ask for help in raising the sum of £100 or £120 towards the enlargement of the School House, now finished?  And how many answers do you think I have had to my apparel?  Not one! Except from some three or four to whom I had personally written, and who have shown by their prompt and very liberal replies their willingness to aid in the work, and at the same time to relieve me of the unpleasant duty cast upon me of raising the money.  My own disappointment is of no moment, but the barren result of my letter compels me once more to place before you the obligation which rests on all who are interested in the welfare of the School to contribute something towards what might be termed the compulsory enlargement fo the School House.  I must again remind you, as in last month’s Magazine, that no special call has been made on you for fifteen years past towards any enlargement or improvement of the School premises, and if our Schools are to be carried on under the voluntary system we must give voluntarily as necessity requires.  Otherwise a School Board will hang over our heads with its heavy expenditure to be borne by a considerable addition to our rates.  What, then, are you going to do?  I cannot think that you would wish to force a School Board upon the Parish just when the District Council are saddling the Parish with a drainage scheme which is to cost £21,000.  Away with such a thought!  But do not be indifferent to our needs.  I am determined to raise the money, but it would please me more to receive your contributions that to have to ask for them personally.  The enlargement has been carried out, and it only remains to pay the bill.  Again, therefore, I ask you one and all to send me a contribution. 
 

         

        

First uploaded: 30 December 2020