The BWI Archives

1901 ~ School Finances

                                    

Ruislip Church of England School
Finances - 1901

In the April Parish Magazine there was the regular annual appeal for those wealthier parishioners who had promised financial support for the school ('Subscribers') to make their payment: 

April 1901

The National School

We are now in the last quarter of our school year, and we venture to remind subscribers that their subscriptions are now due.  It will save much trouble if they will kindly send on the amount of their subscriptions without delay.  The funds are at present very low.  We hope to say something more on this subject next month.

    

Over the previous few years the school Managers had been engaged in a upgrading of both the school house and the school itself.  The extension and redecoration of the house had been paid for through a specific subscription.  However, the work to the school building was reliant on funds supplied by the 'subscribers'.  If the full cost of all the then current works was to be met, as well as those in the future, there was a strong need both to increase the number of subscribers, and, for those already giving, to increase their amounts.  And so, in the May edition of the Parish Magazine, the Vicar, in very similar terms to his predecessor, made an appeal to Parishioners for this increased funding of the school. He also took the opportunity to point out to the poorer families in the community, that, in allowing their children to be frequently absent, to having them educated in other nearby 'national' schools, they were depriving the school of finances through the grants it received.

May 1901

The Vicar’s Letter  

My Dear Friends, -
I wish to bring before you this month, as forcibly as I can, the need of giving a more loyal and generous support to the funds of our National School.  Every one who has any love for our Church, and our religion, ought to make vigorous efforts to help to make our schools as efficient as possible.  The constant fresh demands of the Education Department make the expenses of management each year increasingly greater, and it is only by keeping up the voluntary subscriptions that we can hope to obtain the benefit of the grant in aid.  We have lost several valued subscribers during the past two years by death or removal, while others have reduced their subscriptions.  The result of such action will be most fatal; as the only alternative will be a Board School, which would mean a rate of not less than a shilling in the pound; and I do not suppose that anyone with the prospect of heavy rates for many years to come, necessitated by an expensive drainage scheme, can contemplate such an addition to their expenditure with very great equanimity.  But besides the subscribers, it is necessary that the parents should take a more serious view of the position. Their children are now being educated free of cost to them.  In common gratitude they ought to see that their children attend regularly, as by doing so they materially assist the finances of the school. Every child who is systematically irregular deprives the funds of a grant of 30s. a year, and when twenty or thirty children are thus allowed to offend, the revenues of the school suffer seriously.  We lost about £20 in this way last year as compared with the previous year, and the standard for that year was not at all a good one.  

Again, many parents send their children to neighbouring schools. There are more than thirty that are sent away from the Ruislip School.  These children, if they came to us, would gain a grant of £45 a year. I should like parents to look at the matter in this way.  Take the case of a man with six children.  The average school life of a child now is eight years; each child can obtain a grant of 30s. a year, or £12 in its school life.  The six children would obtain an aggregate of £72.  It these children are sent away from the Ruislip School, that sum is alienated from our funds and presented to another parish!  It cannot be because our school is not doing good work, for it is one of only two schools in the Deanery which obtains the highest grant all round.  

In conclusion, let me urge you to increase your subscription, to send your children more regularly, and be loyal to your own parish, and send your children to your own school.

    

Publication of the Annual accounts also appeared in the August edition of the Parish Magazine: 

 

Ruislip Schools.
Balance Sheet for the Year ending May 31st, 1901

Income

 

 

 

 

Expenditure

 

 

 

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

£

s.

d.

Balance in hand, June 1st, 1900

84

9

11

 

Salaries of Teachers

88

0

0

Grant from Board of Education

146

8

9

 

Salaries of Assistants

148

6

8

Fee Grant

50

5

0

 

Books and Stationery

13

14

0

Aid Grant

33

0

0

 

Fuel, Light and Cleaning

38

11

10

Voluntary Contributions of

 

 

 

 

Repairs to Buildings, etc.

72

1

6

   Private Individuals

65

18

6

 

Rates, Taxes, and Insurance

3

18

9

   Societies

13

0

0

 

Other Expenses

3

10

0

Sale of Needlework

2

10

10

 

Balance in hand, May 31st, 1901

28

7

3

Use of Schoolroom

0

17

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

£396

10

0

 

 

£396

10

0

 William A. G. Gray, Hon. Treasurer
Compared with Vouchers and found correct, H. W. Woodbridge, Auditor

 

List of Subscribers to Ruislip Schools  

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

£

s.

d.

The Ecclesiastical Commissioners

3

0

0

 

Mr J. Browning

1

0

0

Mr. A. Helsham-Jones.

2

2

0

 

Mr. J.R. Cooper

1

1

0

Colonel F. Cox

5

0

0

 

Mr. W. Morford

1

0

0

Lord Hillingdon

5

0

0

 

Mr. W. Woodland

1

0

0

Mr. E. Hilliard

3

3

0

 

Mr. John Boyle

4

0

0

Mr. Edwin Ewer

2

0

0

 

Mr. Edward Bluhm

1

10

6

Rev. W.A.G. Gray

3

0

0

 

Mr. F. J. Small

0

10

0

King’s College, Cambridge

10

0

0

 

Mr. J. Wilshin

1

0

0

Mr. R. H. Deane

5

0

0

 

Mr. H. J. Ewer

2

0

0

Mr. Clarke-Thornhill

2

0

0

 

Mr. James Ewer

1

0

0

Mr. H. V. Warrender

3

0

0

 

Mr. Augustus Woodman

0

10

0

Miss Eleanor Warrender

3

0

0

 

Mr. H. Taylor

0

10

0

Mr. W. E. Vellacott

5

0

0

 

Mr. C. Martin

0

10

0

Mrs. Bennett-Edwards

10

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Chester Abercrombie

2

2

0

 

 

£78

18

6

    

In October the Vicar informed Parishioners, through the Parish Magazine, of the level of funding that the school had received through one of its grants - the Aid Grant for voluntary schools.  In it, he notes where the money will be applied (see the calculation entered into the Log Book, pp.274-75) while also drawing attention to the pressure that is being placed on the school through growing numbers of pupils, a situation that had been developing over the past few years.  The Government Inspectors had been commenting for a year or two that this should involve the employment of a 'Certificated' teacher for the younger children - a more expensive option than the then existing 'Articled' teacher. However, as the Vicar notes, the current Articled teacher, like several of her predecessors, had drawn very positive comments from the Inspectors.   

October 1901

Ruislip School. – The Treasurer is glad to be able to report that a Grant in Aid, amounting this year to £50, has been allotted to our School.  It is made for the following purposes: - To maintain the present charge for salaries, £15; to provide for necessary increase of salaries for the current year, £15; and for reflooring part of the Schoolroom, £20.  This grant will be of great service to the finances of our School.  But it will not anything like meet an additional expenditure this year.  The average attendance in the Infant School has now exceeded fifty, and according to the new Code it is necessary to obtain the services of a certificated mistress, which can only be done at considerable increase of expenditure.  It is very unsatisfactory to be thus compelled to make a change in the staff since the last Report states that the teaching as at present conducted is  thoroughly good.

    

        

First uploaded: 02 January 2021
Last updated: 13 February 2021