The BWI Archives

1903 ~ The Parish Magazine

                                    

Saint Martin’s Church, Ruislip
Parish Magazine

The dissemination of information relating to the Ruislip School through the Parish Magazine, and which had been so significant during the nineteenth century, gradually dropped away after the arrival of Revd William Gray.  In large part this may have been due to changes in management and funding resulting from the 1902 Education Act.  But it may also reflect the new Vicar’s perception of the role of the magazine. 

In 1903 we find the parish's first encounter with the figure that was to give his name to the rebuilt school nearly thirty years later, Arthur Foley Winnington- Ingram, Bishop of London.   Given the content of the letter, it likewise provides a foreshadowing of the issues that were to face the school, with its aging building, in the late 1920s and the potential loss of Ruislip's Church School.

We also find mention of a concert given by the school children in March 1903.  This was not recorded by Mr Youens in the Log Book, possibly because all the work to prepare it had been conducted after the school day.           


March 1903

A most successful Entertainment was given in the schoolroom by the school children, under the management of Miss Medcalf, on Feb. 13th, when the room was packed to its utmost capacity, only those who had previously purchased tickets being admitted.  The children acquitted themselves very creditably, the action songs, recitations and dialogues being admirably given, and the evening’s entertainment was thoroughly enjoyed by those who were fortunate enough to obtain admission.  Great praise is due to Miss Medcalf for all the trouble she has taken in teaching the children and the time that she had devoted to them – time necessarily given after her long day’s work in school was over – and to the children also for the accuracy and precision with which they learnt and performed their parts.  The total receipts amounted to £6 3s. 7d. and the expenditure, so far, to £1 16s. 11d. It is proposed to give a tea to all the children who were engaged in the performance, and to give the balance in some form to the old ladies in the Church Houses.

 

June 1903

The School Children’s Concerts

The following is a statement of the accounts of the concerts given by the children under the management of Miss Medcalf, on 13th February, and just after the Easter holidays.  In accordance with Miss Medcalf’s expressed wish the net proceeds of the first concert and a moiety of those of the second concert were distributed by her to the old ladies in the Church Houses – the other moiety being given to the Eastcote Institute – the Committee of which kindly allowed Miss Medcalf to use their piano.    

Receipts

 

 

 

 

Expenditure

 

 

 

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

£

s.

d.

Ist Concert

6

3

7

 

Expenses 1st Concert

1

16

11

2nd Concert

2

11

8

 

Children’s Tea

1

9

5

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses 2nd Concert

 

4

10

 

 

 

 

 

Nine Church House Women, 9/- each

4

1

0

 

 

 

 

 

Eastcote Institute

1

3

2

£

8

15

4

 

£

8

15

4

 

The old ladies, who were delighted with their gift, wish to offer Miss Medcalf their grateful thanks for her kind and generous thought for them.

 

July 1903

London Diocesan Association of Schools

                 The collections on Sunday, July 19th will be given to the above Association in response to the request made by the Bishop of London in the following letter:-

London House,
32, S. James’s Square, S.W.
December 19th, 1902

Dear Brother,
I greatly hope that the Diocese will rally loyally, at this time, round the Diocesan Board of Education.  The Education Bill is now passed, and we know practically the lines on which the London Bill will be laid.  Much of the Diocese comes at once under the Bill which is already passed.  We know, therefore, the worst and the best, and it is clear that three things will be essential:-

(1.)    A United Policy ;
(2.)    A Central Fund for Repairs ;
(3.)    A careful system of Diocesan Inspection

For all these we must look to the Diocesan Board of Education, which will have now a more responsible part to play in the work of the Diocese than ever before.

I hope that increased support may be given in offertories and subscriptions to enable the Board to rise to its responsibilities, and see that no single Church School, even in the poorest district may be lost to the Church and to the nation, but may on the contrary be made more efficient than ever.

Yours very sincerely,
A.F. London

(= Arthur Foley Winnington-Ingram KCVO PC (26 January 1858 – 26 May 1946),  Bishop of London from 1901 to 1939)  

The Education Act, 1902

With the close of our school year, May 31st, the New Education Act comes into force in the school of our parish, as June 1st was the “appointed day” for the County of Middlesex, outside the City of London.  The number of managers for our school will now be six, instead of ten as previously.  Four will be foundation managers, one of whom will be the Vicar "ex-officio.”  One will be elected by the County Council and one by the Parish Council.  At a meeting of the managers held in the school on June 13th Messers. H.V. Warrender, J. Browning and C. Abercrombie were elected “foundation managers.”  The County Council have appointed Mr. Walter Morford, and the Parish Council Mr. R. Hawtrey Deane.

A paper of instructions has been issued by the Technical Education Committee of the County Council on the duties of managers for their guidance, and the Rural Dean, Rev. C.M. Harvey, who has been co-opted a member of the Education Committee of the County Council, asked all school managers and head teachers to meet him and Mr. B.S. Gott, the General Secretary of the Education Committee in conference to discuss the above paper on Friday evening, June 19th, at S. Andrew’s Girls’ School, Uxbridge.  The meeting was very largely attended and great interest was shewn in the various points raised.  Everything, however, seems to be in a very transitional state, and there seems to be great uncertainty how things are to be worked at first.  

  

“Summer Weather”

We have witnessed some extraordinary weather during the last few weeks.  On May 30th, we had a thunderstorm of almost unexampled severity, which began shortly after 12 noon, and continued without any break till after 6 p.m., the tolling of the thunder being for a long time unceasing.  In the course of the storm the lightning struck the chimney of the schoolmaster’s house, and threw a chimney pot and several bricks on to the room of the girls’ play shed.  Fortunately, and providentially, no further damage was done, as Mr. and Mrs. Younes were at home at the time and we congratulate them on their narrow escape. …  

September 1903

Ruislip Church of England School

His Majesty’s Inspector’s Report on the work of the school during the past year is as follows:-

Mixed School. – Very good work has been done here this year.  Exercise books are neat and well written.  Composition is taught throughout the school and Arithmetic is quick and accurate.  Oral answering on Object Lessons is very creditable.”

Infant School. – There has been a large influx of children this year, and at the second visit of Inspection there were present 16 in excess of the accommodation: the staff too was not equal to the number present.  In spite of the difficulties of working in these premises the work reaches a good standard and the order is satisfactory.”

The highest grants have been earned in both school, i.e. 22s. in the Mixed School and 17s. in the Infants.  The amount of grant earned on the average attendance is 149 children £146 8s.

_________________________  

Ruislip Church of England School Accounts

For the year ending May 31st, 1903  

Income

 

 

 

 

Expenditure

 

 

 

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

£

s.

d.

Balance in hand June 1st, 1902

8

5

1

 

Salaries of Head Teacher

98

0

0

Annual Grant from Board of Education

127

18

0

 

Salaries of Assistants

183

12

6

     Aid Grant

40

0

0

 

Books and Stationery

14

6

9

     Fee Grant

63

7

6

 

Fuel, Light and Cleaning

37

10

3

Voluntary Contributions of

 

 

 

 

Rates, Taxes, and Insurance

3

5

0

   Individuals

70

7

0

 

Superannuation of Certificated Teachers

4

2

0

   Societies

13

0

0

 

Diocesan Inspection

1

1

0

Sale of Needlework

1

10

4

 

Advertisements

 

12

0

Hire of Rooms

2

6

0

 

Cheque Book

 

5

0

Adverse Balance

16

0

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£342

14

4

 

Total

£342

14

4

William A. G. Gray, Hon. Treasurer
Examined, compared with Vouchers and found correct,     H. W. Woodbridge, <Auditor>

 

List of Subscribers to Ruislip Schools

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

£

s.

d.

The Ecclesiastical Commissioners

3

0

0

 

H. V. Warrender, Esq.

5

0

0

A. Helsham-Jones, Esq.

2

2

0

 

Miss Eleanor Warrender

5

0

0

Lord Hillingdon, 1902

5

0

0

 

John Boyle, Esq

4

0

0

Lord Hillingdon, 1903

5

0

0

 

J.H. Page, Esq.

1

0

0

Edmund Bluhm, Est., 1902

1

10

6

 

H.J. Ewer, Esq.

3

0

0

Edmund Bluhm, Est., 1903

1

10

6

 

Edwin Ewer, Esq.

2

0

0

King’s College

10

0

0

 

James Ewer, Esq.

1

0

0

Walter Morford Esq.

1

1

0

 

Jason Wilshin, Esq.

1

0

0

Colonel Cox

5

0

0

 

Charles Abercrombie, Esq.

2

0

0

R. H. Deane, Esq.

5

0

0

 

Charles Martin, Esq

 

10

0

R. Clarke-Thornhill, Esq.

2

0

0

 

Mrs. Augustus Woodman

 

10

0

Mrs. Bennett-Edwards

10

0

0

 

Rev. W. Gray

3

0

0

J.R. Cooper, Esq.

1

1

0

 

 

 

 

 

J. Browning, Esq.

1

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

C.W. Millar, Esq.

2

2

0

 

Total

£83

7

0

 

 

First uploaded: 12 January 2021
Last revised: 16 February 2021