The BWI Archives

1958 ~ Diocesan Inspection Report

                           

The London Diocesan Board of Education carried out an annual inspection of its schools.  These inspections were focused on the religious education of pupils, though occasionally touched on other matters. The following transcript of the Inspection Report for 1958, (London Metropolitan Archive, Acc/1035/006/19c-d) is reproduced with the permission of the London Diocesan Board for Schools.

      

CONFIDENTIAL – FOR THE USE OF MANAGERS AND TEACHERS ONLY

LONDON DIOCESAN BOARD OF EDUCATION INCORPORATED
63 KENNINGTON ROAD, LONDON, S.E.1.
9th October 1958  

BISHOP WINNINGTON INGRAM INFANTS AND JUNIOR
MIXED SCHOOL – RUISLIP.
____________________________


Dear Sir,

            This School was visited on Friday, 26th September, 1958, by The Rev. Preb F.A.F. Poulden and The Rev. F.G.W.W. Heydon.

The following Report of the Inspection is submitted to your Managers with the request that they will give it their attention.  

                        Yours faithfully,
                                                L. B. TIRRELL.
                                                            Director of Religious Education.

 

            This is a Primary School of 328 children, divided into eight classes, three of which are Infants’ classes, the other five being Junior Mixed Classes.  There is a daily assembly Worship for each section of the School.  On the day of our visit, the Junior Assembly had to be abandoned owing to a burst water-main which had flooded the School Hall and two of the class-rooms.  The Infants’ Assembly was conducted by the senior Teacher in that section in one of the class-rooms.  This worship was carefully planned and was most reverently carried out, the children taking a full part with reverence and with obvious understanding. This worship sets the tone for the activities of the whole of the School day.  

            The religious instruction has been based upon a local syllabus drawn up some years ago in the Parish and authorised by the School Managers.  This has been modified in the Infants’ section on lines parallel to the recommended Diocesan syllabus.  In some cases in the Junior department there has been a certain amount of widening of the local syllabus on lines very similar to the normal Diocesan Scheme, whilst remaining loyal to the desire of the Managers to base the teaching on a definite doctrinal basis.  This, indeed, is the object of the Diocesan scheme and a general agreement between the aims of the Diocesan Board and the wishes of the local Managers would appear to be very near practical realisation.  Instruction in Worship is provided in the Parish Church by the Parochial Clergy through School Services.  This is a great asset and is supplemented by the general pastoral oversight of the School by the Clergy and by their teaching.

            The response of the children in their classes was excellent.  The Infants talked readily about their work, showing that they receive a sound grounding in the elements of the Christian Faith, on lines entirely suited to very young children.  There is a plentiful supply of pictures, flannel-graphs and film-strips, all of which are sensibly used in the presentation of the lessons.  Class activities are varied and closely related to the needs of religious instruction.  The Infants’ syllabus is properly graded from year to year to provide full opportunity for these young children to use new skills and techniques as they mater them.

            Much of the expression work shows considerable originality and real thought on the part of the children.  The Junior school makes a very satisfactory transition in the lower class from the methods proper to Infants to the more extensive work of Juniors.  The expression work makes new demands which the children are quick to satisfy.  The scheme of work tends to take up a little too much time in the upper classes in the revision of earlier work and this tends to diminish the amount of time which can be given to the consideration of the later prophetic period   However, the teachers are adapting their material to the needs and abilities of the children in a promising manner.  These children show a general level of intelligence which is well above the average and the tone and atmosphere of the whole school are excellent.

 

FRANK A.F. POULDEN
Diocesan Inspector.
     

 

First uploaded: 05 August 2016